Mother Goose Poems



Welcome to the page of Mother Goose Poems and Nursery Rhymes.
There are many theories on whether Mother Goose referred to a real person or if she is a fictional character. There is even speculation of whether Mother Goose represents a witch riding on her broomstick, depicted as her goose. However, despite all of these opinions, Mother Goose Poems seems to incorporate all of the classic rhymes, some of which are very old and tend not to be as popular in modern times. My favourite story is that Mother Goose was Elizabeth Foster Goose, born in 1665, married to Isaac Goose who between them had sixteen children.
It is believed that she used to make up poems and rhymes for her children and grandchildren, which her son-in-law printed!




*** Mother Goose Poems ***


Old Mother Goose,
When she wanted to wander,
Would ride through the air
On a very fine gander.
Jack's mother came in,
And caught the goose soon,
And mounting its back,
Flew up to the moon.

***


A tisket, a tasket,
A green and yellow basket,
I wrote a letter to my love,
And on the way I dropped it.
I dropped it, I dropped it,
And on the way I dropped it.
A little boy picked it up
And put it in his pocket.

***


Baa, baa, black sheep,
Have you any wool?
Yes, marry, have I,
Three bags full;

One for my master,
One for my dame,
But none for the little boy
Who cries in the lane.

*** Mother Goose Poems ***


Little Betty Blue
Lost her holiday shoe;
What shall little Betty do?
Give her another
To match the other
And then she’ll walk upon two.

***


Birds of a feather flock together,
And so will pigs and swine;
Rats and mice will have their choice,
And so will I have mine.

***


Hickety, pickety, my black hen,
She lays eggs for gentlemen;
Gentlemen come every day
To see what my black hen doth lay.

***


Little Bobby Snooks was fond of his books,
And loved by his usher and master;
But naughty Jack Spry, he got a black eye,
And carries his nose in a plaster

***


Butterfly, butterfly,
Whence do you come?
"I know not, I ask not,
Nor ever had a home."
Butterfly, butterfly,
Where do you go?
"Where the sun shines,
And where the buds grow."

*** Mother Goose Poems ***


Bye, baby bunting,
Father’s gone a-hunting,
Mother’s gone a-milking,
Sister’s gone a-silking,
And brother’s gone to buy a skin
To wrap the baby bunting in.

***


Hey, diddle, diddle!
The cat and the fiddle,
The cow jumped over the moon;
The little dog laughed
To see such sport,
And the dish ran away with the spoon.

***

Cock-a-doodle-do!
My dame has lost her shoe,
My master’s lost his fiddle-stick
And knows not what to do.

Cock-a-doodle-do!
What is my dame to do?
Till master finds his fiddle-stick,
She’ll dance without her shoe.

***


Girls and boys, come out to play,
The moon doth shine as bright as day;
Leave your supper, and leave your sleep,
And come with your playfellows into the street.
Come with a whoop, come with a call,
Come with a good will or not at all.
Up the ladder and down the wall,
A half-penny roll will serve us all.
You find milk, and I’ll find flour,
And we’ll have a pudding in half an hour.

*** Mother Goose Poems ***


Cry, baby, cry,
Put your finger in your eye,
And tell your mother it wasn’t I...!

***


There was a crooked man, and he went a crooked mile,
He found a crooked sixpence beside a crooked stile;
He bought a crooked cat, which caught a crooked mouse,
And they all lived together in a little crooked house.

***

Daffy-down-dilly has come to town
In a yellow petticoat and a green gown.

***


Ding, dong, bell,
Pussy’s in the well!
Who put her in?
Little Tommy Lin.

Who pulled her out?
Little Johnny Stout.
What a naughty boy was that,
To try to drown poor pussy-cat.
Who never did him any harm,
But killed the mice in his father’s barn!

*** Mother Goose Poems ***


Doctor Foster went to Glo’ster,
In a shower of rain;
He stepped in a puddle, up to his middle,
And never went there again

***


Eenie, meeny, miney, mo
Catch a tiger by the toe,
If he hollers, let him go
Eenie, meenie, miney, mo.

***


A jolly fat miller is Poopleton Bun.
Without elephant legs that weigh half a ton,
And a face that is round and red as the sun.

*** Mother Goose Poems ***


A robin and a robin's son
Once went to town to buy a bun.
They couldn't decide on plum or plain,
And so they went back home again.

***


Hoddley, poddley, puddle and fogs,
Cats are to marry the poodle dogs;
Cats in blue jackets and dogs in red hats,
What will become of the mice and the rats?

***


Little Tommy Tucker
Sings for his supper.
Whay shall he eat?
White bread and butter.
How will he cut it
Without even a knife?
How can he marry
Without even a wife?

*** Mother Goose Poems ***


Six little mice sat down to spin;
Pussy passed by and she peeped in.
What are you doing, my little men?
Weaving coats for gentlemen.
Shall I come in and cut off your threads?
No, no, Mistress Pussy, you'd bite off our heads.
Oh, no, I'll not; I'll help you to spin.
That may be so, but you're not coming in!

***


What is the rhyme for porringer?
What is the rhyme for porringer?
The king he had a daughter fair.
And gave the Prince of Orange her!

***


Whistle, daughter, whistle,
And you shall have a sheep.
Mother , I cannot whistle,
Neither can I sleep.

Whistle, daughter, whistle,
And you shall have a cow.
Mother , I cannot whistle,
Neither know I how.

Whistle, daughter, whistle,
And you shall have a man.
Mother , I cannot whistle,
But I'll do the best I can.

***



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Mother Goose Poems






















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